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Homecoming Trails in Mexican American Cultural History

Homecoming Trails in Mexican American Cultural History PDF Author: Roberto Cantú
Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
ISBN: 1527568644
Category : Social Science
Languages : en
Pages : 214

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Book Description
This volume brings together a number of critical essays on three selected topics: biography, nationhood, and globalism. Written exclusively for this book by specialists from Mexico, Germany, and the United States, the essays propose a reexamination of Mexican American cultural history from a twenty-first century standpoint, written in English and approached from different analytical models and critical methods, but free of theoretical jargon. The essays range from biographies and memoirs by leading Chicano historians and studies of globalism during the rule of Imperial Spain (1492-1898), to the modern rise and global influence of the United States, particularly in Mexico, Latin America and the Caribbean. Also included are critical studies of novels by Chicano, Latin American, and Caribbean writers who narrate and represent the dominant role played by the United States both within the nation itself and in the Caribbean, thus illustrating the historical parallels and relations that bind Latinos and Americans of Mexican descent. This book will be of importance to literary historians, literary critics, teachers, students, and readers interested in stimulating and unconventional studies of Mexican American cultural history from a global perspective.

Homecoming Trails in Mexican American Cultural History

Homecoming Trails in Mexican American Cultural History PDF Author: Roberto Cantú
Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
ISBN: 1527568644
Category : Social Science
Languages : en
Pages : 214

View

Book Description
This volume brings together a number of critical essays on three selected topics: biography, nationhood, and globalism. Written exclusively for this book by specialists from Mexico, Germany, and the United States, the essays propose a reexamination of Mexican American cultural history from a twenty-first century standpoint, written in English and approached from different analytical models and critical methods, but free of theoretical jargon. The essays range from biographies and memoirs by leading Chicano historians and studies of globalism during the rule of Imperial Spain (1492-1898), to the modern rise and global influence of the United States, particularly in Mexico, Latin America and the Caribbean. Also included are critical studies of novels by Chicano, Latin American, and Caribbean writers who narrate and represent the dominant role played by the United States both within the nation itself and in the Caribbean, thus illustrating the historical parallels and relations that bind Latinos and Americans of Mexican descent. This book will be of importance to literary historians, literary critics, teachers, students, and readers interested in stimulating and unconventional studies of Mexican American cultural history from a global perspective.

Mexican Mural Art

Mexican Mural Art PDF Author: Roberto Cantú
Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
ISBN: 1527562751
Category : Art
Languages : en
Pages : 289

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Book Description
This volume collects the work of prominent art critics, art historians, and literary critics who study the art, lives, and times of the leading Mexican muralists José Clemente Orozco, Diego Rivera and, among other artists, David Alfaro Siqueiros. Written exclusively for this book in English or in Spanish, and with a full-length introduction (in English), the selected essays respond to a surging interest in Mexican mural art, bringing forth new interpretations and perspectives from the standpoint of the 21st century. The volume’s innovative and varied critical approaches will be of interest to a wide readership, including professors and students of Mexican muralism, as well as the speculative reader, public libraries, and art galleries around the world.

José Antonio Villarreal and Pocho

José Antonio Villarreal and Pocho PDF Author: Roberto Cantú
Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
ISBN: 1527588777
Category : Art
Languages : en
Pages : 140

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Book Description
This book blends biography, history, and literary criticism in its analysis of Pocho (1959), José Antonio Villarreal’s evocative and semi-autobiographical novel about Richard Rubio, a Mexican American youth raised in a pastoral community in central California where people self-identified according to race, ethnicity, or religious affiliation. Richard is the son of an Indigenous Maya mother and a Mexican, fair-skin father who fought in the 1910 Mexican Revolution as a cavalryman, placing Richard outside the town’s imposed and regulated ethnic identities. In spite of his varied ancestry, his American birth, and his probing intelligence, Richard’s Indigenous appearance casts him as a social outsider. Pocho was written over a nine-year period of vigorous creativity, and with Villarreal’s power of recall and imagination at their prime. In writing his inaugural novel, Villarreal drew inspiration from modern narratives (paintings, novels, films), and from ancient Greek tragedy to create a Mexican American version of its classical drama ancestor. This book’s critical approach to Villarreal’s literary work is intelligibly written so as to be of access to a broad and all-inclusive readership and institutions, from college and university professors, public libraries, and the general reader to students of US, Mexican American, and world literatures.

The Writers Directory

The Writers Directory PDF Author:
Publisher:
ISBN:
Category : Authors, American
Languages : en
Pages : 1046

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Book Description


Notable Hispanic American Women

Notable Hispanic American Women PDF Author: Diane Telgen
Publisher: VNR AG
ISBN: 9780810375789
Category : Social Science
Languages : en
Pages : 448

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Book Description
Contains short biographies of three hundred Hispanic American women who have achieved national or international prominence in a variety of fields.

Official Master Register of Bicentennial Activities

Official Master Register of Bicentennial Activities PDF Author: American Revolution Bicentennial Administration
Publisher:
ISBN:
Category : American Revolution Bicentennial, 1976
Languages : en
Pages : 596

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Book Description


Who Belongs?

Who Belongs? PDF Author: Mikaëla M. Adams
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190619481
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 336

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Book Description
Who can lay claim to a legally-recognized Indian identity? Who decides whether or not an individual qualifies? The right to determine tribal citizenship is fundamental to tribal sovereignty, but deciding who belongs has a complicated history, especially in the South. Indians who remained in the South following removal became a marginalized and anomalous people in an emerging biracial world. Despite the economic hardships and assimilationist pressures they faced, they insisted on their political identity as citizens of tribal nations and rejected Euro-American efforts to reduce them to another racial minority, especially in the face of Jim Crow segregation. Drawing upon their cultural traditions, kinship patterns, and evolving needs to protect their land, resources, and identity from outsiders, southern Indians constructed tribally-specific citizenship criteria, in part by manipulating racial categories - like blood quantum - that were not traditional elements of indigenous cultures. Mikaëla M. Adams investigates how six southern tribes-the Pamunkey Indian Tribe of Virginia, the Catawba Indian Nation of South Carolina, the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina, the Seminole Tribe of Florida, and the Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida-decided who belonged. By focusing on the rights and resources at stake, the effects of state and federal recognition, the influence of kinship systems and racial ideologies, and the process of creating official tribal rolls, Adams reveals how Indians established legal identities. Through examining the nineteenth and twentieth century histories of these Southern tribes, Who Belongs? quashes the notion of an essential "Indian" and showcases the constantly-evolving process of defining tribal citizenship.

Equestrian Rebels

Equestrian Rebels PDF Author: Roberto Cantú
Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
ISBN: 1443893218
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 380

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Book Description
Mariano Azuela (Mexico, 1873–1952) was a medical doctor by profession, recipient of Mexico’s Premio Nacional de Literatura (1949), a distinguished member of El Colegio Nacional and, by mid-century, one of Mexico’s leading novelists and literary critics. The author of novels, novellas, plays, biographies, and literary criticism, Azuela served as field doctor under Francisco Villa during the Mexican Revolution and, after Villa’s military defeats in 1915, published Los de abajo (The Underdogs, 1915) while in exile in El Paso, Texas. This book of essays commemorates the first centenary of Los de abajo, and traces its impact on twentieth-century autobiographies, memoirs and, more specifically, on the Novel of the Mexican Revolution. Equestrian Rebels: Critical Perspectives on Mariano Azuela and the Novel of the Mexican Revolution includes a full-length introduction and nineteen essays by leading international scholars who study Azuela and other novelists of the Mexican Revolution – such as Martín Luis Guzmán, Nellie Campobello and, among others, José Rubén Romero – from current, yet contrasting and innovative theoretical perspectives. Especially written for this volume, these critical essays are grouped into five sections that separately probe and analyze Azuela’s realism and contemporary affinities with photography; Azuela’s literary criticism; centennial studies on Los de abajo; critical approaches to other novels by Azuela; three independent analyses of Nellie Campobello’s Cartucho (1931); and a concluding section on literary representations of Mexican colonialism and revolution in the narratives of Juan Rulfo (El llano en llamas), Carlos Fuentes (Gringo viejo), and David Toscana (El último lector). This book will be of importance to scholars, teachers, students, and the general reader interested in topics related to the literary, cultural, and political forces and conflicts that led to the transformation of Mexico into a modern nation.

American Encounters

American Encounters PDF Author: Angela L. Miller
Publisher: Prentice Hall Press
ISBN:
Category : Art
Languages : en
Pages : 712

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Book Description
"Contextual in approch, this text draws on socio-economic and political studies as well as histories of religion, science, literature, and popular culture, and explores the diverse, conflicted history of American art and architecture. Thematically interrelating the visual arts to other material artifacts and cultural practices, the text examines how artists and architects produced artwork that visually expressed various social and political values."--Publisher's website.

The Darkest Period

The Darkest Period PDF Author: Ronald D. Parks
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 0806145757
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 336

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Book Description
Before their relocation to the Indian Territory in present-day Oklahoma, the Kanza Indians spent twenty-seven years on a reservation near Council Grove, Kansas, on the Santa Fe Trail. In The Darkest Period, Ronald D. Parks tells the story of those years of decline in Kanza history following the loss of the tribe’s original homeland in northeastern and central Kansas. Parks makes use of accounts by agents, missionaries, journalists, and ethnographers in crafting this tale. He addresses both the big picture—the effects of Manifest Destiny—and local particulars such as the devastating impact on the tribe of the Santa Fe Trail. The result is a story of human beings rather than historical abstractions. The Kanzas confronted powerful Euro-American forces during their last years in Kansas. Government officials and their policies, Protestant educators, predatory economic interests, and a host of continent-wide events affected the tribe profoundly. As Anglo-Americans invaded the Kanza homeland, the prairie was plowed and game disappeared. The Kanzas’ holy sites were desecrated and the tribe was increasingly confined to the reservation. During this “darkest period,” as chief Allegawaho called it in 1871, the Kanzas’ Neosho reservation population diminished by more than 60 percent. As one survivor put it, “They died of a broken heart, they died of a broken spirit.” But despite this adversity, as Parks’s narrative portrays, the Kanza people continued their relationship with the land—its weather, plants, animals, water, and landforms. Parks does not reduce the Kanzas’ story to one of hapless Indian victims traduced by the American government. For, while encroachment, disease, and environmental deterioration exerted enormous pressure on tribal cohesion, the Kanzas persisted in their struggle to exercise political autonomy while maintaining traditional social customs up to the time of removal in 1873 and beyond.