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Cbt For Mild To Moderate Depression And Anxiety

Cbt For Mild To Moderate Depression And Anxiety PDF Author: Hughes, Colin
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education (UK)
ISBN: 0335242081
Category : Psychology
Languages : en
Pages : 240

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Book Description
The book gives information and support using evidence-based, low-intensity psychological treatments involving CBT for mild to moderate mental illness.

Cbt For Mild To Moderate Depression And Anxiety

Cbt For Mild To Moderate Depression And Anxiety PDF Author: Hughes, Colin
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education (UK)
ISBN: 0335242081
Category : Psychology
Languages : en
Pages : 240

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Book Description
The book gives information and support using evidence-based, low-intensity psychological treatments involving CBT for mild to moderate mental illness.

EBOOK: CBT Fundamentals: Theory and Cases

EBOOK: CBT Fundamentals: Theory and Cases PDF Author: Vanessa Skinner
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education (UK)
ISBN: 0335247849
Category : Psychology
Languages : en
Pages : 280

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Book Description
CBT Fundamentals: Theory and Cases is an indispensable, introductory guide for all mental health practitioners embarking on CBT training. Designed to be read with no prior knowledge of CBT, the book takes the reader through the essential principles and theory of contemporary CBT in a readable and accessible manner. It then outlines the most commonly used models and applies them to a range of mental health problems a novice CBT practitioner will encounter, from depression to anxiety disorders and PTSD. Wrycraft and Skinner make an excellent use of the case study format and link theory and practice in an instructive and engaging way, promoting your learning. The cases convey a realistic sense of using CBT and working to both engage and promote therapeutic progress in peoples' lives. While placing an emphasis upon promoting engagement and implementing therapeutic interventions with clients and patients, CBT Fundamentals also addresses the difficulties, limitations and dilemmas encountered in practice in a pragmatic and constructive manner. This is a useful addition to any CBT reading list. A range of reflective components, together with exercises and a range of case studies, encourages the reader to contribute to their learning experience in a participatory way. It will make a welcome addition to students wanting to explore the area of psychosocial interventions. Bruce Wallace, Visiting Lecturer in Mental Health at University of Bedfordshire, UK This new book provides a good, authoritative introduction to CBT and how it might be applied to a range of different settings. The case study format and style make it easy to read and follow whilst keeping the content fresh. I will be encouraging my students to make use of the book as part of their studies in mental health nursing. Paul Linsley, Principle Lecturer in Health and Social Science at Lincoln University, UK

Behind the Screen

Behind the Screen PDF Author: Johan Lundgren
Publisher: Linköping University Electronic Press
ISBN: 9176854027
Category :
Languages : en
Pages : 110

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Book Description
Introduction The prevalence of depressive symptoms in persons with heart failure is higher than in age- and gender-matched populations not suffering from heart failure. Heart failure in itself is associated with an unpredictable trajectory of symptoms, a poor prognosis, high mortality and morbidity, and low health-related quality of life (HrQoL). With the addition of depressive symptoms to heart failure the negative health effects increase further. Though the negative consequences of depressive symptoms in heart failure are well known, there is a knowledge gap about the course of depressive symptoms in heart failure and about how to effectively manage these symptoms. Pharmacological treatment with serotonin reuptake inhibitors has not been able to demonstrate efficacy in persons with heart failure. In a few studies, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) delivered face-to-face, has demonstrated effects on depressive symptoms in persons with heart failure. However, currently there are barriers in delivering face-to-face CBT as there is a lack of therapists with the required training. As a solution to this, the use of Internet-based CBT (ICBT) has been proposed. ICBT has been shown to be effective in treatment of mild and moderate depression but has not been evaluated in persons with heart failure. Aim The overall aim of this thesis was to describe depressive symptoms over time and to develop and evaluate an ICBT intervention to treat depressive symptoms in persons with heart failure. Design and Methods The studies in this thesis employ both quantitative (Studies I, II and III) and qualitative (Studies II and IV) research methods. The sample in Study I (n=611) were recruited in the Netherlands. The participants (n=7) in Study II were recruited via advertisements in Swedish newspapers. Studies III and IV used the same cohort of participants (Study III n=50, Study IV n=13). These participants were recruited via an invitation letter sent to all persons who had made contact with healthcare services in relation to heart failure during the previous year, at the clinics of cardiology or medicine in four hospitals in southeast Sweden. Study I had a quantitative longitudinal design. Data on depressive symptoms was collected at baseline (discharge from hospital) and after 18 months. Data on mortality and hospitalisation was collected at 18 and 36 months after discharge from hospital. Study II employed three differentBehind the Screen2patterns of design, as follows: I) The development and context adaptation of the ICBT program was based on research, literature and clinical experience and performed within a multi-professional team. II) The feasibility of the program from the perspective of limited efficacy and function was investigated with a quantitative pre-post design. III) Participants’ experience of the ICBT program was investigated with a qualitative content analysis. Data on depressive symptoms was collected pre and post intervention. The time used for support and feedback was logged during the intervention, and qualitative interviews were performed with the participants after the end of the intervention. Study III was designed as a randomised controlled trial. A nine-week ICBT program adapted to persons with heart failure and depressive symptoms was tested against an online moderated discussion forum. Data on depressive symptoms, HrQoL and cardiac anxiety was collected at baseline (before the intervention started) and after the end of the intervention (approximately 10 weeks after the start of the intervention). Study IV had a qualitative design to explore and describe participants’ experiences of ICBT. The participants were recruited from within the sample in Study III and all had experience of ICBT. Data collection occurred after the ICBT program ended and was carried out using qualitative interviews by telephone. Results The mean age of the samples used in this thesis varied between 62 and 69 years of age. Concerning the symptom severity of heart failure, most persons reported New York Heart Association (NYHA) class II (40-57%) followed by NYHA class III (36-41%). Ischaemic heart disease was the most common comorbidity (36-43%). The vast majority had pharmacological treatment for their heart failure. Six percent of the persons in Study I used pharmacological antidepressants. In Studies II and III, the corresponding numbers were 43% and 18% respectively. Among persons hospitalised due to heart failure symptoms, 38% reported depressive symptoms. After 18 months, 26% reported depressive symptoms. Four different courses of depressive symptoms were identified: 1) Non-depressed 2) Remitted depressive symptoms. 3) Ongoing depressive symptoms. 4) New depressive symptoms. The highest risk for readmission to hospital and mortality was found among persons in the groups with ongoing and new depressive symptoms. A nine-week ICBT program consisting of seven modules including homework assignments on depressive symptoms for persons with heart failure was developed and tested. The RCT study (Study III) showed no significant difference in depressive symptoms between ICBT and a moderated discussion forum. Within-group analysis of depressive symptoms demonstrated a significant decrease of depressive symptoms in the ICBT group but not in the discussion forum group. The participants’ experience of ICBT was described in one theme: ICBT- an effective, but also challenging tool for self-management of health problems. This theme was constructed based on six categories: Something other than usual healthcare; Relevance and recognition; Flexible, understandable and safe; Technical problems; Improvements by live contact; Managing my life better. Conclusion After discharge from hospital, depressive symptoms decrease spontaneously among a large proportion of persons with heart failure, though depressive symptoms are still common in persons with heart failure that are community dwelling. Depressive symptoms in persons with heart failure are associated with increased risk of death and hospitalisation. The highest risks are found among persons with long-term ongoing depressive symptoms and those developing depressive symptoms while not hospitalised. ICBT for depressive symptoms in heart failure is feasible. An intervention with a nine-week guided self-help program with emphasis on behavioural activation and problem-solving skills appears to contribute to a decrease in depressive symptoms and improvement of HrQoL. When ICBT is delivered to persons with heart failure and depressive symptoms the participants requests that the ICBT is contextually adapted to health problems related to both heart failure and depressive symptoms. ICBT is experienced as a useful tool for self-care and something other than usual healthcare. ICBT also requires active participation by the persons receiving the intervention, something that was sometimes experienced as challenging.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy-motivated Interviewing Treatment for Substance Use and Co-occurring Disorders

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy-motivated Interviewing Treatment for Substance Use and Co-occurring Disorders PDF Author: Diana Corwin Gordon
Publisher:
ISBN:
Category : Cognitive therapy
Languages : en
Pages : 232

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Book Description
Substance Use Disorders are prevalent in the general population, and frequently co-occur with other psychiatric disorders. Both Substance Use Disorders and other psychiatric disorders are more severe and less responsive to treatment when they co-occur than when they occur alone. Both Motivational Interviewing (MI) and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) have been demonstrated to be effective for Substance Use Disorders in multiple randomized controlled trials. MI has been shown to enhance motivation for change for patients with SUDs as well as other psychiatric disorders, while CBT has been shown to be effective for the treatment of a variety of psychiatric disorders including mild to moderate depression and anxiety. A limited body of evidence suggests that both CBT and MI may be effective for the treatment of SUDs and co-occurring disorders concurrently. Additionally, the few studies that have examined integrated CBT and MI treatments for SUDs have demonstrated that such integrated treatments may be effective. The following literature review establishes a rationale for integrating CBT and MI for the treatment of SUDs and co-occurring mild to moderate depression and anxiety. Following the literature review, a treatment manual consisting of sixteen modules is included. The manual is designed to address mild to severe Substance Use Disorders, with four modules designated for use with higher severity populations. The manual also addresses co-occurring psychopathology, including mild to moderate depression and anxiety. Additionally, the manual is suitable for patients with harm reduction, reduced use, and abstinence goals. Literature examining the effectiveness of treatment manuals has suggested that manuals that allow for a high degree of flexibility and clinical judgment are most effective. Thus, this manual is designed to provide clinicians with a structure that will allow them to present the material using their own clinical judgment and style. The manual is designed to be a cost-effective alternative to the multitude of highly specific manuals available that do not address all types of SUDs and/or co-occurring psychopathology.

Psychological Interventions In Mental Health Nursing

Psychological Interventions In Mental Health Nursing PDF Author: Smith, Grahame
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education (UK)
ISBN: 0335244165
Category : Medical
Languages : en
Pages : 192

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Book Description
This book fills the gap in the market for an introductory text on mental health nurses that explores the psychological interventions used with mental health patient groups.

Depression: New Insights for the Healthcare Professional: 2011 Edition

Depression: New Insights for the Healthcare Professional: 2011 Edition PDF Author:
Publisher: ScholarlyEditions
ISBN: 1464900248
Category : Psychology
Languages : en
Pages : 441

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Book Description
Depression: New Insights for the Healthcare Professional: 2011 Edition is a ScholarlyEditions™ eBook that delivers timely, authoritative, and comprehensive information about Depression. The editors have built Depression: New Insights for the Healthcare Professional: 2011 Edition on the vast information databases of ScholarlyNews.™ You can expect the information about Depression in this eBook to be deeper than what you can access anywhere else, as well as consistently reliable, authoritative, informed, and relevant. The content of Depression: New Insights for the Healthcare Professional: 2011 Edition has been produced by the world’s leading scientists, engineers, analysts, research institutions, and companies. All of the content is from peer-reviewed sources, and all of it is written, assembled, and edited by the editors at ScholarlyEditions™ and available exclusively from us. You now have a source you can cite with authority, confidence, and credibility. More information is available at http://www.ScholarlyEditions.com/.

OECD Health Policy Studies Making Mental Health Count The Social and Economic Costs of Neglecting Mental Health Care

OECD Health Policy Studies Making Mental Health Count The Social and Economic Costs of Neglecting Mental Health Care PDF Author: Hewlett Emily
Publisher: OECD Publishing
ISBN: 9264208445
Category :
Languages : en
Pages : 244

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Book Description
This book addresses the high cost of mental illness, the organisation of care, changes and future directions for the mental health workforce, indicators for mental health care and quality, and tools for better governance of the system.

Behind the Screen

Behind the Screen PDF Author: Johan Lundgren
Publisher:
ISBN:
Category :
Languages : en
Pages :

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Book Description
Introduction The prevalence of depressive symptoms in persons with heart failure is higher than in age- and gender-matched populations not suffering from heart failure. Heart failure in itself is associated with an unpredictable trajectory of symptoms, a poor prognosis, high mortality and morbidity, and low health-related quality of life (HrQoL). With the addition of depressive symptoms to heart failure the negative health effects increase further. Though the negative consequences of depressive symptoms in heart failure are well known, there is a knowledge gap about the course of depressive symptoms in heart failure and about how to effectively manage these symptoms. Pharmacological treatment with serotonin reuptake inhibitors has not been able to demonstrate efficacy in persons with heart failure. In a few studies, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) delivered face-to-face, has demonstrated effects on depressive symptoms in persons with heart failure. However, currently there are barriers in delivering face-to-face CBT as there is a lack of therapists with the required training. As a solution to this, the use of Internet-based CBT (ICBT) has been proposed. ICBT has been shown to be effective in treatment of mild and moderate depression but has not been evaluated in persons with heart failure. Aim The overall aim of this thesis was to describe depressive symptoms over time and to develop and evaluate an ICBT intervention to treat depressive symptoms in persons with heart failure. Design and Methods The studies in this thesis employ both quantitative (Studies I, II and III) and qualitative (Studies II and IV) research methods. The sample in Study I (n=611) were recruited in the Netherlands. The participants (n=7) in Study II were recruited via advertisements in Swedish newspapers. Studies III and IV used the same cohort of participants (Study III n=50, Study IV n=13). These participants were recruited via an invitation letter sent to all persons who had made contact with healthcare services in relation to heart failure during the previous year, at the clinics of cardiology or medicine in four hospitals in southeast Sweden. Study I had a quantitative longitudinal design. Data on depressive symptoms was collected at baseline (discharge from hospital) and after 18 months. Data on mortality and hospitalisation was collected at 18 and 36 months after discharge from hospital. Study II employed three differentBehind the Screen2patterns of design, as follows: I) The development and context adaptation of the ICBT program was based on research, literature and clinical experience and performed within a multi-professional team. II) The feasibility of the program from the perspective of limited efficacy and function was investigated with a quantitative pre-post design. III) Participants’ experience of the ICBT program was investigated with a qualitative content analysis. Data on depressive symptoms was collected pre and post intervention. The time used for support and feedback was logged during the intervention, and qualitative interviews were performed with the participants after the end of the intervention. Study III was designed as a randomised controlled trial. A nine-week ICBT program adapted to persons with heart failure and depressive symptoms was tested against an online moderated discussion forum. Data on depressive symptoms, HrQoL and cardiac anxiety was collected at baseline (before the intervention started) and after the end of the intervention (approximately 10 weeks after the start of the intervention). Study IV had a qualitative design to explore and describe participants’ experiences of ICBT. The participants were recruited from within the sample in Study III and all had experience of ICBT. Data collection occurred after the ICBT program ended and was carried out using qualitative interviews by telephone. Results The mean age of the samples used in this thesis varied between 62 and 69 years of age. Concerning the symptom severity of heart failure, most persons reported New York Heart Association (NYHA) class II (40-57%) followed by NYHA class III (36-41%). Ischaemic heart disease was the most common comorbidity (36-43%). The vast majority had pharmacological treatment for their heart failure. Six percent of the persons in Study I used pharmacological antidepressants. In Studies II and III, the corresponding numbers were 43% and 18% respectively. Among persons hospitalised due to heart failure symptoms, 38% reported depressive symptoms. After 18 months, 26% reported depressive symptoms. Four different courses of depressive symptoms were identified: 1) Non-depressed 2) Remitted depressive symptoms. 3) Ongoing depressive symptoms. 4) New depressive symptoms. The highest risk for readmission to hospital and mortality was found among persons in the groups with ongoing and new depressive symptoms. A nine-week ICBT program consisting of seven modules including homework assignments on depressive symptoms for persons with heart failure was developed and tested. The RCT study (Study III) showed no significant difference in depressive symptoms between ICBT and a moderated discussion forum. Within-group analysis of depressive symptoms demonstrated a significant decrease of depressive symptoms in the ICBT group but not in the discussion forum group. The participants’ experience of ICBT was described in one theme: ICBT- an effective, but also challenging tool for self-management of health problems. This theme was constructed based on six categories: Something other than usual healthcare; Relevance and recognition; Flexible, understandable and safe; Technical problems; Improvements by live contact; Managing my life better. Conclusion After discharge from hospital, depressive symptoms decrease spontaneously among a large proportion of persons with heart failure, though depressive symptoms are still common in persons with heart failure that are community dwelling. Depressive symptoms in persons with heart failure are associated with increased risk of death and hospitalisation. The highest risks are found among persons with long-term ongoing depressive symptoms and those developing depressive symptoms while not hospitalised. ICBT for depressive symptoms in heart failure is feasible. An intervention with a nine-week guided self-help program with emphasis on behavioural activation and problem-solving skills appears to contribute to a decrease in depressive symptoms and improvement of HrQoL. When ICBT is delivered to persons with heart failure and depressive symptoms the participants requests that the ICBT is contextually adapted to health problems related to both heart failure and depressive symptoms. ICBT is experienced as a useful tool for self-care and something other than usual healthcare. ICBT also requires active participation by the persons receiving the intervention, something that was sometimes experienced as challenging.

HCI International 2021 - Late Breaking Posters

HCI International 2021 - Late Breaking Posters PDF Author: Constantine Stephanidis
Publisher: Springer Nature
ISBN: 3030901793
Category :
Languages : en
Pages :

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Book Description


Integrated Behavioral Health Practice

Integrated Behavioral Health Practice PDF Author: Michael A. Mancini
Publisher: Springer Nature
ISBN: 3030596591
Category : Psychology
Languages : en
Pages : 392

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Book Description
This valuable resource prepares graduate-level students in social work and other helping professions to provide integrated behavioral health services in community-based health and mental healthcare settings. Responding to the increasing prevalence of behavioral health issues in the general U.S. population and the resulting additional responsibilities for social workers and health professionals, this textbook describes the latest evidence-based practices and interventions for common behavioral health disorders as well as issues related to suicide, violence, substance use, and trauma. Detailed case studies help illustrate the effects of a range of interventions, inviting readers to consider how best to implement behavioral health assessment and treatment practices that are evidence-based, trauma-informed, and recovery-oriented. In addition to outlining integrated behavioral health service models and assessment tools, chapters address specific topics such as: Public health approaches to addressing interpersonal violence Intersections of social, behavioral, and physical health Achieving recovery and well-being from behavioral health disorders Motivating clients to achieve and maintain recovery from addiction Stage-based treatments for substance use disorders Cognitive behavioral approaches to treating anxiety and depressive disorders Evidence-based approaches to treating the effects of trauma and PTSD Integrated Behavioral Health Practice equips graduate students and health professionals alike to provide sensitive and informed interprofessional care for patients and families while consistently engaging in practices that emphasize recovery and well-being.